wehaveallgotknives: new plan: michael k williams for vimes, idris elba for vetinari??

notbecauseofvictories:

glintglimmergleam:

notbecauseofvictories:

Better new plan:

  • Michael K Williams for Vimes
  • Yvette Nicole for Sybil Ramkin
  • Andre Braugher as Vetinari (he does not fit my physical type for Vetinari at all, Vetinari is built like a rake and played by Charles Dance, but I have been rewatching Brooklyn 99 and this is a picture that exists)
  • Meredith Eaton as Cheery because she’s delightful I love her
  • Tommy Lister as Detritus
  • (Alfre Woodard to play Margolotta I will actually fight you on this)
  • There are other people in these books, but I’d need more time
  • …and I’m sorry, the only Discworld character I can possibly see Idris Elba being is Carrot, though he’s on the old side for that.

Richard Ayoade as Rincewind

Stephanie Beatriz as Arabella Dearheart

Kal Penn as Moist von Lipwig

OH MAN Stephanie Beatriz as Adora Belle that’s 800% something I can get behind.

Ever since the (sadly canceled) Go On, I’ve liked John Cho for Moist, because he plays “charming vastly overconfident fuck-up” very well, but Kal Penn is much more Moist’s physical type.

Going to add Chi McBride as Mustum Ridcully (he’s not really old enough, but he’s the only non-Monty Python actor I trust to have the comedic chops, plus to sense of the authority and the physical type)

Raza Jaffrey is exactly what I pictured William de Word looking like, down to the ears, but I’m not entirely confident in his non-Broadway acting skills. Still—exactly.

Meeral Syal would make a great Nanny Ogg.

meaganfanart:

broccoleafveins:

See the full footage here: Winston (kitty) takes care of Zeke (puppy) 
 "Zeke just got home from the vet — being allergic to certain grasses, he broke out in hives and they gave him steroid and benadryl shots. This is Winston, loving and taking care of him"

A cats purr vibrates at a frequency that promotes bone health and aids in healing. So the kitty is probably trying to purr him better.
meaganfanart:

broccoleafveins:

See the full footage here: Winston (kitty) takes care of Zeke (puppy) 
 "Zeke just got home from the vet — being allergic to certain grasses, he broke out in hives and they gave him steroid and benadryl shots. This is Winston, loving and taking care of him"

A cats purr vibrates at a frequency that promotes bone health and aids in healing. So the kitty is probably trying to purr him better.
meaganfanart:

broccoleafveins:

See the full footage here: Winston (kitty) takes care of Zeke (puppy) 
 "Zeke just got home from the vet — being allergic to certain grasses, he broke out in hives and they gave him steroid and benadryl shots. This is Winston, loving and taking care of him"

A cats purr vibrates at a frequency that promotes bone health and aids in healing. So the kitty is probably trying to purr him better.

meaganfanart:

broccoleafveins:

See the full footage here: Winston (kitty) takes care of Zeke (puppy) 

 
"Zeke just got home from the vet — being allergic to certain grasses, he broke out in hives and they gave him steroid and benadryl shots. This is Winston, loving and taking care of him"

A cats purr vibrates at a frequency that promotes bone health and aids in healing. So the kitty is probably trying to purr him better.

(via whataregritsanyway)

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

(via heartfullofshutup)